Jennifer R Steele

Associate Professor

York-Massey Fellow

Locations / Contact Info:

331 Behavioural Science - BSB
Keele Campus
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext. 22156

Email address(es):

steeleje@yorku.ca

Web site(s):

Dr. Steele's IPSC Research Laboratory

Faculty & School/Dept.

Faculty of Health - Department of Psychology

Degrees

PhD - 2003
Harvard University
Boston, MA

Biography

Dr. Steele received her B.A. in psychology (1995) as well as her B.Ed. (1996) from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. From there she moved to Boston, Massachusetts where she attended Harvard University's School of Education. She completed a Masters in Education in 1997 and proceeded into the doctoral program in Social Psychology. Dr. Steele completed her M.A. (1999) and her Ph.D. (2003) in Social Psychology through the Graduate School of Arts and Science at Harvard University (supervisor: Dr. Nalini Ambady). After completing a SSHRC post-doctoral position at the University of Waterloo (supervisor: Dr. Steve Spencer) she accepted an assistant professorship at York University in Toronto.  Dr. Steele is currently an Associate Professor of Psychology in the Faculty of Health at York University. 

Dr. Steele has made a number of service contributions at York University.  Leadership roles include serving as Area Coordinator for the Social/Personality graduate area in the Department of Psychology for three years (2012-2015) and holding the inaugural position of Associate Undergraduate Program Director for three years (2015-2018) during a time of significant curricular restructuring.  She has also served on the Academic Standards, Curriculum, and Pedagogy (ASCP) Senate Committee (2014-2017), the Department of Psychology Executive Committee (2007-2009; 2015-2018), Undergraduate Studies Committee (2011-2012; 2013-2018), and Tenure and Promotion Committee (2015-2017), while contributing to numerous recruiting and hiring committees.  Outside of the university, Dr. Steele has been as a reviewer for tri-council grant applications (SSHRC Insight and Insight Development Grants) and is a member of editorial boards for several journals in our field. 

For the 2018-2019 academic year, Dr. Steele was awarded a York-Massey Fellowship, through Massey College at the University of Toronto.  She concurrently holds a visiting professorship in the Department of Psychology, University of Toronto during her sabbatical.  

 

 

Selected Publications

These are selected publications.  Please access http://www.yorku.ca/steeleje/research/publications.php to obtain copies of these and other publications by Dr. Steele for personal use.



Steele, J. R., George, M., Williams, A., & Tay, E. (2018). A cross-cultural investigation of children’s implicit attitudes toward White and Black racial outgroups. Developmental Science.



Williams, A. & Steele, J.R.(2017). Examining children’s implicit racial attitudes using exemplar and category-based measures. Child Development.



Gonzalez, A. M., Steele, J.R., Baron, A.S.(2016). Reducing children’s implicit racial bias through exposure to positive outgroup exemplars. Child Development, 88, 123–130. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12582



Ng, A. H, Steele, J. R., & Sasaki, J. (2016). Will you remember me? Cultural differences in own-group face recognition biases. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 64, 21-26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2016.01.003



Pauker, K., Williams, A., & Steele, J. R.(2016). Children’s racial categorization in context. Child Development Perspectives, 10 (1), 33–38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12155



Williams, A. & Steele, J. R. (2016). The reliability of child-friendly race-attitude Implicit Association Tests. Frontiers: Quantitative Psychology and Measurement, 7, 1-11. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01576



Williams, A., Steele, J. R., Lipman, C. (2016). Assessing children’s implicit attitudes using the Affective Misattribution Procedure. Journal of Cognition and Development, 17, 505-525. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2015.1061527



Régner, I., Steele, J. R., Ambady, N., Thinus-Blanc, C., & Huguet, P. (2014). Our future scientists: A review of stereotype threat in young girls from early elementary school to middle school. International Review of Social Psychology [Special Issue: Stereotype threat in children], 27, 13-51.



Steele, J. R., Bianchi, E. C., & Ambady, N. (2014). The effect of racial primes on the test performance of African-American and European-American children. International Review of Social Psychology [Special Issue: Stereotype threat in children], 27, 161-174.



 


Supervision

Currently available to supervise graduate students: Yes

Currently taking on work-study students, Graduate Assistants or Volunteers: Yes

Available to supervise undergraduate thesis projects: Yes

Current Research

Dr. Steele's research takes a social cognitive approach to understanding stereotyping, prejudice, and interpersonal expectancies. One main goal of the research that is currently being pursued in the IPSC lab is to increase our understand of implicit racial biases and gender stereotyping in childhood. We are particularly interested in understanding the malleability of children's implicit biases as well as the developmental course and consequences of biases among minority and majority children.

Our research, which is conducted with adult and child participants, has been funded by various external and internal sources including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Faculty of Health, and York University.

If you would like to learn more about our research, please see:

http://www.yorku.ca/steeleje/research/index.php

Research Projects

The Emergence and Universality of Implicit Racial Bias in Children
Role: Principal Investigator
Year Funded: 2009
Duration: 3
Funded by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Understanding children's implicit attitudes and intergroup biases
Role: Principal Investigator
Year Funded: 2014
Duration: 5
Funded by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Understanding the Development and Consequences of Racial Stereotyping: A Social Cognitive Approach
Role: Principal Investigator
Year Funded: 2006
Funded by: Canada Foundation for Innovation